Sutton Gallery stands on what always was and always will be the land of the Wurundjeri people of the Kulin nation. We respectfully recognise their ancestors and Elders past and present. We acknowledge Aboriginal connection to material and creative practice on these lands for more than 60,000 years.

Recent News

Karen Black: Finalist in the Sulman and Archibald Prizes

Karen Black is a finalist in this year’s Sulman and Archibald Prizes.

Her work Both of us (2024) has been selected as a Sulman Prize finalist, an award given to a selected genre or subject painting. Black explained how the work explores the ways in which “energies and vibrations between two people sharing common life experiences can create a strong bond and sense of connection.” Concerning the coalescent forces invoked by the law of attraction, Black’s work aims to further an understanding of how individuals with similar energies, vibrations and mindsets tend to gravitate towards each other.

Additionally, Black’s portrait of arts professional Vivian Vidulich has been selected for the Archibald Prize. A three-time finalist in the prize, the work is an affectionate ode to a long-time friend of the artist. On the painterly and compositional rationale behind the work, Black explained how she “couldn’t have made this painting unless it showed her from head to toe. I [Black] wanted to portray the generous, gentle, kind person she is, but also show her strength and resilience.”

Karen Black’s paintings included the Archibald and Sulman Prize exhibitions will be on show at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, from 8 June – 8 September 2024. The winner of each prize will be announced on 7 June 2024.

Archibald, Wynne and Sulman Prizes 2024
Art Gallery of New South Wales, Gadigal Country
Naala Nura, Lower level 2
8 June – 8 September 2024; touring thereafter.

Mia Boe: Finalist in the Archibald Prize 2024

Mia Boe’s portrait of Tony Armstrong has been awarded as a finalist of the Archibald Prize 2024 at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney.

Keen to paint Armstrong because he is ‘so likeable and joyful’, Mia Boe remarked on how her sitter was ‘hard-working and committed to sharing stories. He is an amazing example not only for First Nations people, but for all people.’

Armstrong, a former AFL player and current television presenter and producer, visited Boe’s Melbourne studio for the sitting. Boe explain how the two ‘talked about life, pressure in the public eye, and connection with mob. We also discussed portraits we liked. I showed him William Dargie’s portrait of Albert Namatjira [which won the 1956 Archibald Prize], as I wanted to convey that same sense of complicated emotions in the eyes that Dargie was able to portray’.

A first-time Archibald finalist, Boe decided on Armstrong as a fitting subject for her first entry into the acclaimed prize, explaining how ‘[she] wanted to show that, despite Tony’s new fame, he has an inner world of doubts and turmoil that he doesn’t share with the country. I [Boe] wanted to juxtapose reality and myth, joy and tribulation, and create a sense of your surroundings not feeling real.’

The Archibald Prize 2024 will be on show at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, from 8 June – 8 September 2024. The winner of the prize will be announced on 7 June 2024.

Archibald, Wynne and Sulman Prizes 2024
Art Gallery of New South Wales, Gadigal Country
Naala Nura, Lower level 2
8 June – 8 September 2024; touring thereafter.

David Rosetzky at RMIT Gallery

David Rosetzky’s work How To Feel (2010) will be on view within the collection group exhibition, Working Title: Studio Practice in the RMIT Art Collection at the RMIT Gallery in Melbourne.

This exhibition aims to unearth a rich history of studio practice at RMIT, revealing notable academics, alumni, methods and collaborations across collecting legacies over the past century.

Rosetzky’s film work reflects on shifts in social relations between public and private life, both on and away from the screen. In a highly individualised society where self-determination and self-improvement are taken as a given, How To Feel provides an intimate portrait of a fractured and proliferating self, acutely affected by our environment and reflective of the people that surround us.

Working Title: Studio Practice in the RMIT Art Collection
RMIT Gallery, Naarm/Melbourne
30 May – 27 July 2024
Opening event: Thursday, 6th June (6–8pm)

Nicholas Mangan in conversation at the MCA

On the occasion of the artist’s mid-career survey at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Sydney, Nicholas Mangan will be in conversation with Katerina Teaiwa, Professor of Pacific Studies at the Australian National University (ANU), on Saturday, 25th May.

Hosted by MCA Senior Curator Anneke Jaspers, this ‘Artist Plus One’ event unpacks environmental and historical impacts of phosphate mining in the central Pacific, drawing on Professor Teaiwa’s extensive research in the area, and Mangan’s artwork Nauru – Notes from a Cretaceous World.

Artist Plus One: Nicolas Mangan and Professor Katerina Teaiwa (talk)
Museum of Contemporary Art Australia (MCA), Tallawoladah, Gadigal Country
Saturday 25th May, 2–3pm

Please note that this event is ticketed and has limited capacity.

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