Nicholas Mangan

Alert to both history and science, Nicholas Mangan is a multi-disciplinary artist known for unearthing and interrogating narratives embedded in objects, times and places. Through a practice bridging drawing, sculpture, film and installation, Mangan creates politically astute and disconcerting assemblages that address some of the most galvanizing issues of our time; the ongoing impacts of colonialism, humanity’s fraught relationship with the natural environment and the complex and evolving dynamics of the global political economy.

Select solo exhibitions: Termite Economies, Sutton Gallery, Melbourne, 2018; Limits to Growth, Monash University Museum of Art (MUMA), Melbourne, the Institute of Modern Art (IMA), Brisbane, Kunst-Werke Institute of Contemporary Art, Berlin, Dowse Art Museum, New Zealand, 2016; Ancient Lights, Chisenhale Gallery, London, 2015. Brilliant Errors, Sutton Gallery, Melbourne, 2015; Some Kinds of Duration, Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne, 2012; Between a Rock and a Hard Place, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 2009; and The Colony, Gertrude Contemporary Art Spaces, Melbourne, 2005.

Select group exhibitions: A World Undone, Biennale of Sydney, Sydney, 2018; Let’s Talk About the Weather: Art and Ecology in A Time of Crisis, Guangdong Times Museum, Guangzhou, 2018; 74 million million million tons, SculptureCenter, New York, 2018; The National 2017: new Australian art, AGNSW, Sydney, 2017; 4.543 BILLION. The Matter of matter, CAPC, Bordeaux, 2017; The Eighth Climate (What does art do?), Gwangju Biennale, GwangjuSeMA Mediacity Biennale, Seoul, 2016; Riddle of the Burial Grounds, Project Arts Centre, Dublin, 2015; Surround Audience, New Museum Triennial, New York, 2015; Concrete, Tophane-i Amire Culture, Arts Center Mimar Sinan Fine Art University Istanbul, Turkey, 2015; Art in the Age of…, Witte de With, Rotterdam, 2015; Anthropocene Moment, Les Abattoirs, Toulouse.

Artist's CV (PDF)

[Mangan] distills in to poetic form some of the most pressing issues of our day and situates them in a nearly unfathomable astrological time.

Aileen Burns, Charlotte Day, Krist Gruijthuijsen, Johan Lundh, 2016