Jackson Slattery

Slattery’s practice operates within the grey area between external and internal realities, tantalising the viewer with what is depicted and what is implied. In collecting disparate and diverse images then meticulously reconstructing them, Slattery alludes to a narrative of events, one that is concerned as much with fiction as with the realities that they are extracted from. Though he is known for his meticulously painted watercolours and oil paintings, Slattery’s practice branches out with a radical shift in scale in the form of sculpture and installation.

Select solo exhibitions: Grey Speckled Question Marks, Sutton Gallery, Melbourne, 2017; Points d’Interrogations Blancs, Soon Gallery, Montreal, 2016; Burning Your Furniture to have the Warmest House in the Street, with Kieren Seymour,Alaska Projects, Sydney, 2015; Works on paper, Sutton Projects, Melbourne, 2015; Every Picture, Sutton Gallery, Melbourne, 2015; Tunisian Parquetry, Sutton Gallery, Melbourne, 2014; Halfway to a Dead Heat, Siamese Dream, Montreal, 2014; Wrong Formalism, Sutton Gallery, Melbourne, 2012; Props, Sutton Gallery, 2011; Man Made Paradise, TCB, Melbourne, 2010; Dennis Rodman & My Plastic Everything, Sutton Gallery, Melbourne, 2009; Small Ambition, Gertrude Contemporary, Melbourne, 2009.

Select group exhibitions: Bodies Go Wrong, Orgy Park, Brooklyn, 2017; Media Hype, C3 Contemporary Art Space, Melbourne, 2017; Mile X/Sorrento, TCB, Melbourne, 2016; Head, Incidents Above a Bar, The Alderman, Melbourne, 2015; Drunk vs Stones III, Neon Parc, Melbourne, 2013; Down to the Line, Bett Gallery, Hobart, 2013; Fall Open Studios, ISCP, New York, 2013; Temperament Spectrum: The first twenty-one years 1992 – 2012, Sutton Gallery, Melbourne, 2012; Resident Artist Exhibition, Sammlung Lennikus, Vienna, 2012; Trust Me, with Tony Garifalakis, Galerie Desaga, Cologne, 2011; Cornucopia – recent acquisitions, Geelong Gallery, Geelong, 2010; Primavera, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney; and touring to QUT Art Museum, Fremantle Arts Centre and Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, 2010.

Artist's CV (PDF)

Slattery’s paintings recapture a flickering movement that the digital images he uses wish to immobilize and deny, presenting what writer Paul Carter calls the dark lines of ‘living shadows’ that constitute and occupy our world.

Nicholas Croggon, 2009